Guide to Kitchen Utensils, Pots, Pans and Accessories: Steel - High Carbon

About the uses, care, cost, and controvery surrounding high carbon steel kitchen utensils, pots, pans, and accessories.

A Guide to Kitchen Utensils

STEEL--HIGH CARBON

Properties: Heats up quickly; does not retain temperatures. It may be coated with tin, porcelain, or enamel.

Cost: Price depends on the thickness and the method of processing.

Use: Made into bakeware, crepe and omelet pans, saucepans, oval and regular frying pans--the best come from France and are nicely balanced (lift one!).

Care: First remove the lacquer coating that is applied at the factory by placing the utensil in boiling water for about 10 mins. Allow to cool, then scour the pan inside and out with a brush or a plastic mesh pad in the direction of the grain. Use soapy water (do not use detergents!). Rinse and dry. Pour in a Tbs. of unsalted vegetable oil, and heat until the oil appears thin. Remove from the heat and swirl the oil around so that it covers the bottom and sides. Let it stand 8 to 10 hours, or overnight. Many pans are already seasoned at the factory, but they should be washed anyway. After use, scour briskly with warm water, rinse, and dry. However, if an accumulation of food residue develops, wash the utensil thoroughly, and reseason. Do not store tightly covered because moisture trapped inside may cause rusting.

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